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22 Feb 2017

Giving feedback on student writing is incredibly time consuming. Anything that students can do to help each other and themselves before they submit their final drafts can be a huge time-saver for teachers, but also gives them a unique perspective to look at their writing. Here are some tools that can help your students analyze their work in the drafting stage of the writing process.

Note: All of these tools work on iPads, Chromebooks, and MacBooks. iPad users will need to use Safari for all these tools.

 

Canvas Peer Review:

In Canvas, you can automatically or manually assign peer reviews to students. Simply check the box in the settings for an assignment. While you can do anonymous peer reviews, this disables the ability to comment directly on student work. During peer review, students can use a rubric, submit comments, and annotate a fellow student’s work. Click here to learn more about how to set up a peer review assignment!

 

If a situation arises where one student does not have someone to peer review their work, the tools below can be a great substitute!

 

Hemingway App:

Ernest Hemingway was known for writing concise, tight prose that was simple, bold, and effective. With the Hemingway app, you will be given feedback on use of adverbs, passive voice, and sentence complexity. Your work will be color coded to help you quickly identify issues in your writing. You will also see a readability score and word count to help you get your point across clearly and quickly.

 

Students simply copy and paste their writing into the Hemingway editor to begin. They will lose formatting so if students have bullet points, they will not paste correctly. When you are done, students copy their work from Hemingway and can paste it into Word or Google Docs for final editing and submission.

 

Slick Write:

Slick Write is similar to the Hemingway App in a lot of ways, but comes with more features. Just like Hemingway, you will need to copy and paste your work to and from Slick Write. Once you have entered your writing, you have the option of looking at “features” of your writing such as grammatical errors and adverb usage, “structure” to identify complex sentence structures, and “word variety” to identify and eliminate repetitive word usage.

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